Design & Technology

“A designer knows they have achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.”

 

Staff

Mrs Millership – Head of Department

Miss Walker – Food Teacher

Miss Corcoran – DT Technician

 

D&T KS3

All year 7 and 8 students study 3 modules, one for each term, these are Textiles, Food and Graphics.

Year 7

Textiles

Brief: To design and make a reusable bag based on the images of emoji. Your bag must be suitable to be sold on a stall at the German Market in Birmingham. You must incorporate several different decorative techniques, to make a creative eye catching bag. You will design a logo; swing ticket and price ticket for your bag.

AIM: To develop knowledge and understanding of the design process. Students will learn how to recognise key concepts and skills that can be applied to all areas of the Design Technology curriculum. The project will build on prior learning- Baseline project and primary school experiences. Students will undertake a series of individual tasks using several different decorative techniques; allowing them to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding through planning, making and evaluating.

Food

Brief: To design and make a hand held snack suitable to be sold at in the school canteen taking into consideration the dietary requirements of a student.

AIM: The main aim of this unit is for pupils to explore the properties of ingredients when designing, so that they will be able to identify appropriate ingredients for a task. They will learn the basic skills used in cooking and the health and safety implications of working in a food room. In this unit, pupils will look at the DMA task of making a healthy option snack. They identify suitable ingredients for their food product, taking into account appearance, function, safety and reliability. They will understand the importance of packaging and design their own packaging for their hand held snack. Pupils gain the knowledge; skills and understanding they need to carry out the DMA successfully through product evaluation activities and focused practical tasks. They consider the aesthetics of food, e.g. appearance, taste, odour, texture, and how this affects what consumers choose, consider nutritional aspects and values, sources and functions, e.g. protein, fat, carbohydrate, vitamins, minerals, water, finally they standardise the results of sensory testing and use their findings.

Graphics

In this booklet students will learn how to develop their drawing skills and their ability to use of colour to create realistic-looking designs and sketches of 3D objects. They will be introduced to the basic principles of Graphics. Students use the skills and techniques that they have learnt in this booklet to design an eye-catching poster to advertise a set of Children’s Building Blocks.

Year 8

Textiles

Brief: To design and make a ‘pencil roll’ based on the art movement: ‘Pop Art’. Your design must be creative and include different decorative techniques. You should consider the use of different components for fastening your pencil roll.

AIM: To develop knowledge and understanding of the design process. To be able to use contemporary pattern and culture as an inspiration for design work, understanding applications across all areas of Design Technology. Students will build on their skills, knowledge and understanding of decorative techniques with further opportunity for independent learning. Additionally students will undertake focused practical tasks through which to develop skills in construction and accurate, controlled, use of the sewing machine.

Food

Brief: To design and make a dish suitable for a person with a specialist dietary requirement such as a vegetarian; coeliac; or a person with diabetes. Your dish should be based on Italian cuisine and be suitable to be put on a menu at an Italian restaurant. You must think of a name for the restaurant and design a logo; shop front design and a menu to be put on the restaurant tables.

AIM: The main aim of this unit is for pupils to explore the properties of ingredients when designing, so that they will be able to identify appropriate ingredients for a task. They will understand the importance of brand identity and promoting products. In this unit, pupils will look at the DMA task of making a healthy option ready meal.  This involves designing a sauce combined with other ingredients to make a ready-prepared meal. They identify suitable ingredients for their food product, taking into account appearance, function, safety and reliability. Pupils gain the knowledge; skills and understanding they need to carry out the DMA successfully through product evaluation activities and focused practical tasks. They apply their understanding of the physical and chemical properties of foods, e.g. coagulation of protein, gelatinisation of starch, shortening of fats, water absorption of fibre, consider the aesthetics of food, e.g. appearance, taste, odour, texture, and how this affects what consumers choose, consider nutritional aspects and values, sources and functions, e.g. protein, fat, carbohydrate, vitamins, minerals, water and finally standardise the results of sensory testing and use their findings.

Graphics

Students learn how to sketch and draw 3D shapes and objects realistically, How to draw in One and Two Point Perspective and How to design mechanisms About the Vacuum-Forming Process and Thermoplastics. Eventually Students design and make a working Gumball Machine that dispenses sweets or gumballs.

 

D&T KS4 (Years 9, 10, 11)

These courses are optional.

AQA GCSE Art and Design Textiles (8204)

Component 1: Portfolio

What’s assessed

A portfolio that in total shows explicit coverage of the four assessment objectives. It must include a sustained project evidencing the journey from initial engagement to the realisation of intentions and a selection of further work undertaken during the student’s course of study.

60% of GCSE

 

Component 2: Externally set assignment

What’s assessed

Students respond to their chosen starting point from an externally set assignment paper relating to their subject title, evidencing coverage of all four assessment objectives.

Preparatory period followed by 10 hours of supervised time

40% of GCSE

 

 

AQA GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

Exam: Food preparation and nutrition

What’s assessed

Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes (100 marks)

50% of GCSE

 

Non-exam assessment (NEA)

What’s assessed

Task 1: Food investigation (30 marks)

Students’ understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients.

Practical investigations are a compulsory element of this NEA task.

Task 2: Food preparation assessment (70 marks)

Students’ knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task.

Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved.

 

WJEC Hospitality and Catering Level 1 / 2 Award ( vocational)

WJEC Level 1/2 Vocational Awards enable learners to gain knowledge, understanding and skills relating to a specific vocational sector. In addition to development sector specific knowledge and understanding, these qualifications also support learners to develop the essential employability skills that are valued by employers, further and higher education.

Consists of:

Unit 1 The Hospitality and Catering Industry ( Exam 40%)

Unit 2 Hospitality and Catering in Action controlled assessment ( 60%)

 

OCR Cambridge National Certificate in  Child Development

This consists of 3 units:

Unit 1 – The first unit underpins all of the other learning in this qualification. All students will learn the essential knowledge and understanding for child development, covering reproduction, parental responsibility, antenatal care, birth, postnatal checks, care, conditions for development, childhood illnesses and child safety. Knowledge gained would be of use for further studies in PHSE, Biology and other Child Development qualifications.

Unit 2 – Students will gain knowledge of the equipment needs of babies and young children and an understanding of the factors to be considered when choosing appropriate equipment to meet all of these needs. They will also gain knowledge of nutrition and hygiene practices and will be given the opportunity to evaluate dietary choices. Evaluation skills are transferable skills which would be of use in further studies in most areas.

Unit 3 – Students will gain knowledge of, and skills in, developing activities to observe development norms in children up to the age of five. This unit will include researching, planning, carrying out activities with children and observing and reviewing these activities, as well as an understanding of the development norms and the benefits of play in child development. These transferable skills will support further studies in many other subjects.